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An Archive of 1919:
The Year of the Crack-up

Global Events in 1919

This anti-memorial examines the various traumatic events that occurred in the year 1919 around the world, including the United States and India. It was the year after the first world war, and many significant events happened around the world - the Treaty of Versailles was finalized in 1919, other treaties of 1919 created the countries of the Middle East as we know it today, and Ireland’s war of independence from the British empire began in 1919, to name just a few, (Wilmer 1919).

When I started investigating 1919 and creating this project, I didn’t have much to go by except my own research in libraries and Wikipedia. But since then, a book titled “1919: A Turning Point in World History” has come out in which the authors are thinking on the same lines, (Sharp and Fraser 2014).

Tamas: An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry

Installation view of An Archive of 1919: The Year of the Crack-Up, at the Whittier Storefront Gallery, Minneapolis, MN.

The authors write, "1919 was a pivotal year. While the Paris Peace Conference dominated the headlines, events elsewhere in the world would significantly impact the twentieth century and beyond. In Ireland, Egypt, India, China, and the Middle East, Britain, France, and Japan faced gathering resistance to their rule. Nationalist leaders like Gandhi, Saad Zaghlul, and Ho Chi Minh rose to prominence, while the leaders of the Irish rebellion against Britain enjoyed immediate success. In 1919 the world was poised between triumphant imperialism and emerging nationalism," (Sharp and Fraser 2014).

Spittoon engraved and enameled with "Treaty of Versailles" on the top and a map of Paris showing where the event took place, An Archive of 1919 by Pritika Chowdhry.

Spittoon engraved and enameled with "Treaty of Versailles" on the top and a map of Paris showing where the event took place.

The authors continue, "1919 also witnessed fear of communism on a global scale, fuelled by Bolshevik success in Russia, a short-lived revolutionary government in Munich, and Bela Kun's seizure of power in Hungary. In Italy and Germany, Fascism and National Socialism emerged as alternatives to both Communism and the bourgeois status quo, while in the United States Attorney General Mitchell Palmer's attempts to quell radicalism and enforce Prohibition launched the career of J. Edgar Hoover," (Sharp and Fraser 2014).

Spittoon engraved and enameled with "Treaty of Versailles" on the top and a map of Paris showing where the event took place, An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry..

By looking beyond Europe and the first six months of 1919, including the Third Afghan War, this book gives a global perspective of the events and upheavals of that year, 1919.”

Spittoon engraved and enameled with "Third Anglo-Afghan War" on the top and a map showing where the war took place.

(Sharp and Fraser 2014)

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Spittoon engraved and enameled with "Treaty of Versailles" on the top and a map of Paris showing where the event took place, An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry.

Jallianwallan Bagh Massacre

On April 13, 1919, in a small town called Amritsar in Punjab, India, General Dyer led ninety British army soldiers and opened fire on a peaceful gathering of about 5000 unarmed men, women, and children in a public park called the Jallianwala Bagh. Walls of adjoining houses surrounded the park, and there was only one narrow passageway to enter or exit from the park (Jallianwallan Bagh 1919).

The troops blocked this gate and fired till they ran out of ammunition. They gave no warnings to the people or opportunity to disperse. There was a well on the grounds of Jallianwallan Bagh, and several people jumped into the well to escape Gen. Dyer's bullets and drowned.

 

Civil Surgeon Dr. Smith indicated more than 2000 casualties, including 150 bodies recovered from the well. Though it was a footnote in world history, the Jallianwala Bagh Massacre, as it came to be called, was the catalyst that launched India's Independence movement (Wagner 2019).

Close-up of the spittoon engraved with "Jallianwallan Bagh" and a map of Amritsar showing where the event took place, on the brick well.

Jallianwallan Bagh Memorial

The American architect, Benjamin Polk, was commissioned to build a memorial on the site in 1951. When the memorial was being built, the local residents decided to preserve the bullet holes in the walls of the Jallianwallan Bagh site. These bullet holes are poignant memory traces of the massacre. The Jallianwalln Bagh memorial is a lieux de memoire, or a site of memory in Pierre Nora’s words (Nora 1989).

The Jallianwallan Bagh Memorial, in Amritsar, India.

The Jallianwallan Bagh Memorial in Amritsar, India. 

The narrow entrance and exit of the Jallianwallan Bagh.

The narrow entrance and exit of the Jallianwallan Bagh site.

Bullet holes preserved in the Jallianwallan Bagh Memorial.

Bullet holes preserved in the Jallianwallan Bagh Memorial.

The Martyrs' Well in Jallianwallan Bagh, recreated in "Rang De Basanti" movie.

The Martyrs' Well in Jallianwallan Bagh, recreated in "Rang De Basanti" movie.

I visited Jallianwallan Bagh in 2008 and became very intrigued by this site. A phallic structure has been built in the center of the site surrounded by beautiful gardens. The well is covered up and is now called the Martyrs’ Well. The bullet holes in the wall had a visceral impact on me, and the access to the site is still through the same narrow gate, and hall, which made me a bit claustrophobic.

Counter-Memories of 1919

Bloody Sunday in Ireland

April 13, 1919, was a Sunday and is referred to as the Bloody Sunday of Amritsar. A similar incident in Dublin during the Irish War of Independence began in 1919 and lasted till 1922.

 

On November 21, 1920, IRA operatives went to many addresses and killed or fatally wounded 15 men of the British Army. Later that day, British forces raided a Gaelic football match in Croke Park, and without warning opened fire on the players and the spectators, killing or fatally wounding 14 civilians and wounding at least sixty others, (Bloody Sunday 1920).

Spittoon engraved and enameled with "Irish Declaration of Independence" and a map of Dublin showing where the event took place, An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry..

Spittoon engraved and enameled with "Irish Declaration of Independence" and a map of Dublin showing where the event took place.

Counter-Memories of 1919

Working from a hunch that events of this scale and brutality do not happen in isolation, I started researching the year 1919. I found that the British empire was under siege everywhere, especially in Ireland, and one could argue that the British probably wanted to make an example with the Jallianwallan Bagh massacre. Not surprisingly, I found that there were political and military turmoils going on in Germany, China, Russia, and the Middle East, and America.

The counter-memories embedded in these events create a rich archive from a transnational perspective. Michel Foucault coined the term, “Counter-Memory” to describe a modality of history that opposes history as knowledge or history as truth. For Foucault, counter-memory was an act of resistance in which one critically examines the history and excavates the narratives that have been subjugated, (Foucault 1977).

Spittoon engraved and enameled with "May Fourth" and a map of Tiananmen Square, An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry.

Spittoon engraved and enameled with "May Fourth" and a map of Tiananmen Square showing where the event took place. 

The other events of 1919 included in this project are the May Fourth Revolution, in Tiananmen Square, China; the Turkish War of Independence, in Istanbul, Turkey; the Russian Civil War, in Kiev; creation of the Weimar Republic, in Germany; the Race Riots of Chicago, in America; the Great Iraqi Revolution, in Baghdad; the Third Anglo-Afghan War, in Peshawar; the Red Flag Riots, in Brisbane, Australia; the Egyptian Revolution, in Cairo; the Third Battle of Juarez, in El Paso; the Irish Declaration of Independence, in Dublin; and the Middle East as we know it was being created.

The Anti-Memorial

When a memory is unbearable, how do you memorialize it? Traditional rituals and forms of memorialization would not have worked to memorialize these grim events. What is needed is an anti-memorial that will not let people forget the year 1919. So, I decided to make an anti-memorial that would serve as an archive of the year 1919, (Young Fall 1997).

Another installation view of Tamas (Darkness): An Archive of 1919, at the Whittier Storefront Gallery, Minneapolis, MN.

Installation view of "An Archive of 1919: The Year of the Great Crack-Up," by Pritika Chowdhry

Installation view of "An Archive of 1919: The Year of the Crack-Up," at the Whittier Storefront Gallery, Minneapolis, MN.

The 1919 anti-memorial is comprised of three component parts. The first component is a series of fourteen brass spittoons. The second component is a recreation of the Martyrs' Well. And the third component is a video montage that is projected on the wall.

Containers of Counter-Memory

Each of the fourteen spittoons is etched with the name of an event and a map that locates the city and building in which the event occurred. The work thus functions as an archive of the year 1919 in which the spittoons are containers of memory.

The name of the event and a map that locates the city and building in which the event occurred has been enameled and etched on brass spittoons.

 

Spittoons were popular in the early 1900s and their use declined from 1920s onwards with the advent of mass-produced cigarettes. I acquired spittoons from the early 1900s to 1920s from antique shops and as such, they are cultural and material artifacts of that time. Now they are considered antique and decorative items are no longer in use.

 

People expectorated spit, phlegm, chewing tobacco, etc., in spittoons. This discarded bodily waste (spit) is made to function as a metaphor for the events that a nation or a people forget as if history itself were a cultural waste and was being discarded.

The work thus serves as a record of the year 1919 in which the spittoons function as containers of memory.

Tamas: An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry

Another installation view of  An Archive of 1919: The Year of the Great Crack-Up," at the Whittier Storefront Gallery, Minneapolis, MN.

The Martyrs' Well as a container of counter-memory

Tamas: An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry

The second component is a well-like structure in the center of the gallery space using old bricks sourced locally.

 

This well references the Martyrs' Well in Jallianwallan Bagh, but thus displaced, it becomes a precarious container of counter-memory. The well is created to look like a broken-down, crumbling well that is no longer in active use. 

The spittoons representing the two central events of this anti-memorial, the Jallianwallan Bagh and the Treaty of Versailles, are placed on the well, to create visual and historical focus.

Close-up of the well in the center, showing the spittoon of the Treaty of Versailles, and the spittoon of the Jallianwallan Bagh.

A video montage

The third component is a video montage projected on the walls. The montage shows the narrow entrance of the Jallianwallan Bagh, the bullet holes preserved in the walls surrounding the Jallianwallan Bagh, and few frames showing the reconstructed Martyrs’ Well from the movies, “Gandhi” (Attenborough 1982) and “Rang De Basanti” (Mehra 2006). As these images flicker on the walls, the video montage collapses the past and the present.

The work thus serves as a record of the year 1919 in which the spittoons function as containers of memory. Spittoons were popular in the early 1900s and their use declined from 1920s onwards with the advent of mass-produced cigarettes. I have acquired spittoons from the early 1900s to 1920s from antique shops and as such, they are cultural and material artifacts of that time.

Intertextual References

I often mine literary sources to articulate and cite specific theses in my work. Intertextuality is a literary device that creates an 'interrelationship between texts' and generates related understanding in separate works. In this case, I am creating an interrelationship between a visual work and two separate works of historical fiction, (Intertextuality n.d.). There are two intertextual references in this work.

Spittoons in Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children

So, why spittoons, you might ask. As I was researching this project, I began to make some unexpected connections with Salman Rushdie’s book, The Midnight’s Children. Rushdie’s protagonist has a special relationship with a spittoon, an inherited family heirloom. Literary scholars have argued that in Rushdie’s novel the spittoon as a vessel becomes the holder of individual and national memories. Midnight's Children also has an entire chapter based on the Jallianwallan Bagh Massacre, titled Mercurochrome, (Rushdie 1981).

Tamas by Bhisham Sahni 

Archive of 1919

Arguably, creative works function as non-hegemonic and at times, oppositional archives of history. The "An Archive of 1919: The Year of the Crack-Up" anti-memorial functions as a visual and experiential archive of the year 1919, and as an anti-memorial that suggests possible connections between historical events across time and space. The events referenced in this project are listed below. Each event is memorialized by an individual spittoon that is etched with its name, and a map that locates the event geographically in the city and country where it happened.

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Middle East Theater" and a map of showing the Sykes-Picot secret treaty, An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry.

Middle Eastern Theater of World War I

29 October 1914 and 30 October 1918 

The Middle Eastern Theatre of World War I created the Middle East as we know it today. Allied and Central Powers fought numerous battles – Britain and India defeated Turkey, and Turkey fought Russia amongst other forces. Four years of fighting, conflict, and bloodshed came to an end with signing a peace treaty on August 10, 1920. The Sykes-Picot secret agreement of 1916, which divided the Middle East into four zones of influence, was ratified in the Treaty of Versailles (Middle Eatern Theater of WWI 1914).

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Middle East Theater" and a map of showing the Sykes-Picot secret treaty

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Irish Declaration of Independence" and a map of Dublin, where the declaration was made, An Archive of 1919 by Pritika Chowdhry.

The Irish Declaration of Independence

21 January 1919 

The Irish Declaration of Independence on 21 January 1919, conclusively marked the island as a sovereign state, independent from British rule. Notably, the declaration was preceded by ‘The Proclamation of the Republic’, a formal document asserting Ireland’s independence. The 1919 Declaration ratified the 1916 proclamation of the Easter Rising. The 1919 Irish Declaration of Independence honors the Easter Rising revolutionaries and is a concrete marker of Irish freedom (Irish Declaration 1919).

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Irish Declaration of Independence" and a map of Dublin, where the declaration was made.

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Egyptian Revoultion" and a map of Cairo, where the revolution occurred, An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry.

The First Egyptian Revolution

8 March 1919 to 25 July 1919 

The first Egyptian Revolution occurred from 8 March 1919 to 25 July 1919. Saad Zaghlul was a nationalist politician who fought for Egyptian self-determination. In 1918, the British rejected his demands to travel to Paris for the Peace Conference. Zaghlul and his political party were arrested and exiled, sparking the beginning of the revolution in 1919, where strikes and riots pervaded the city of Cairo (Egyptian Revolution 1919). 

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Egyptian Revoultion" and a map of Cairo, where the revolution occurred.

Red Flag Riots_Tamas: An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry

Brisbane’s Red Flag Riots

24 March 1919 

Brisbane’s Red Flag Riots were born out of a combination of patriotism, xenophobia, and post-war trauma. The riots started on 24 March 1919 and lasted three days, during which around 8,000 Anglo-Australians turned against Russian communities in Brisbane and neighboring towns. The main event happened on March 24 at the Russian Hall in South Brisbane. Police surrounded the Hall on horseback and foot, carrying bayonets and rifles (Red Flag Riots 1919).

 

Despite being armed, rioters outnumbered law enforcement resulting in the injury of officers and their horses. Riots, looting, and destruction ensued, wrecking the Russian Hall and surrounding homes and shops. Shockingly, it was the Russians who were held responsible for the riots. 

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Red Flag Riots" and a map of Brisbane, where the anti-Russian riots happened.

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Jallianwallan Bagh" and a map of Amritsar, where the massacre happened, An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry.

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Jallianwallan Bagh" and a map of Amritsar, where the massacre happened.

Jallianwalla Bagh Massacre

13 April 1919 

Central to Tamas is the Jallianwalla Bagh massacre which occurred on 13 April 1919. Ninety British soldiers opened fire on a group of five thousand unarmed civilians. Walls standing ten to sixteen feet high surrounded men, women, and children. The soldiers directed their bullets at the crowds swarming the gate - the only means of escape. There were at least fifteen hundred deaths and over a thousand casualties. Included were those who had jumped into a well in desperation and subsequently drowned (Jallianwallan Bagh 1919).

The Jallianwalla Bagh Massacre became a rallying cry for India's Independence Movement.  

Spittoon engraved and enameled "May Fourth Revolution" and a map of Tiananment Squre, where the revolution happened, An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry.

May Fourth Movement

4 May 1919 

Extreme patriotism and a passion for societal reform came to a head in China on 4th May 1919 at Tiananmen Square. The so-called May Fourth Movement saw over 3,000 students from colleges around Beijing uniting against the Versailles Peace Conference.  The students burned the Ministry of Communications, assaulted China’s minister to Japan, and instigated strikes and boycotts against Japanese imports. After two months of demonstrations, the Chinese government yielded to the growing public opinion, officials resigned and China declined to sign the German peace treaty (May Fourth 1919). 

Spittoon engraved and enameled "May Fourth Revolution" and a map of Tiananment Squre, where the revolution happened.

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Third Anglo-Afghan War" and a map of Afghanistan, where the war happened, An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry.

Third Anglo-Afghan War

6 May 1919 - 8 August 1919 

In February 1919, Amanullah Khan revoked the Treaty of Gandamak and announced full Afghan independence. Three months later, Afghan troops invaded British India on 6 May 1919. Realizing his flawed ambitions, Amanullah ordered a ceasefire on 3rd July 1919, and the Third Anglo-Afghan War ended with an armistice on 8 August 1919. Despite this supposed failure, Amanulla was successful in achieving his main goal - Afghan independence. The war ended with an armistice in the form of the Treaty of Rawalpindi which handed Afghanistan full rights over their foreign affairs (Anglo-Afghan War 1919).

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Third Anglo-Afghan War" and a map of Afghanistan, where the war happened.

Turkish War of Independence_Tamas: An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry

The Turkish War of Independence

19 May 1919 – 24 July 1923 

The Turkish War of Independence lasted from 19 May 1919 – 24 July 1923 and stood as a critical moment in modern Turkish history. Unrest stirred by the Greek occupation of Izmir – to which Mustafa Kemal retaliated by organizing a resistance. A series of military campaigns ensued against Greece, Armenia, France, Britain, and Italy. Meanwhile, Turkish nationalists turned on native Christian communities, resulting in massacres and riots, extending World War I’s ‘ethnic cleansing’ operations. The Treaty of Lausanne was finally passed in 1923, concluding World War I, signed by Turkey and Britain, France, Italy, Japan, Greece, Romania, and Yugoslavia (Turkish War 1919).

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Turkish War of Independence" and a map of Turkey, where the war happened.

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Third Battle of Juarez" and a map of Ciudad Juarez, where the battle happened, An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry.

The Third Battle of Juarez

June 15–16, 1919  

The Third Battle of Juarez occurred on June 15 and 16, 1919. The battle is highly significant as it marked the end of the first period of the Mexican Revolution and the last involving rebel leader Pancho Villa. Villa and fellow rebel leader Pascual Orozco led forces against the dictator Porfiro Diaz by launching an attack on federal troops at Ciudad Juárez. The attack incited an intervention by the US army, thus making the battle the largest of the Mexican Revolution to involve American troops. Villa and his men retreated, only to attempt and fail in a further attack on Durango. After the bloodshed of The Third Battle of Juarez, Villa withdrew from the front and was granted a full pardon (Battle of Juarez 1919).

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Third Battle of Juarez" and a map of Ciudad Juarez, where the battle happened.

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Treaty of Versailles" and a map of Paris, where the conference occurred and the treaty was signed, An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry.

Treaty of Versailles

28 June 1919  

On 28 June 1919, the Treaty of Versailles was signed into effect, and it is widely considered one of history’s most controversial armistice treaties.

 

The contentious ‘guilt clause’ blamed Germany for the First World War, leading to economic vulnerability and the opportunity for the rise of the Nazi’s. The treaty is thought to be the catalyst for the horror that ensued with Hitler’s reign over Germany in many ways (Treaty of Versailles 1919).

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Treaty of Versailles" and a map of Paris, where the conference occurred and the treaty was signed.

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Weimar Republic" and a map of Weimar in Germany, where the republic was constituted.

Weimar Republic

11 August 1919

The grueling years of World War I left Germany economically and socially unstable. There was great resentment amongst the Germans towards those who had contributed to the Treaty of Versailles and its demonization of Germany – including their own government. The Weimar Republic is so-called because the assembly that adopted its constitution met at Weimar from 6 February 1919 to 11 August 1919. The Republic's first Reichspräsident ("Reich President"), Friedrich Ebert of the Social Democratic Party of Germany, signed the new German constitution into law on 11 August 1919. From 1919 to 1933, the Weimar Republic governed Germany (Weimar Republic 1919). 

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Weimar Republic" and a map of Weimar in Germany, where the republic was constituted.

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Race Riots" and a map of the South Side of Chicago, where the riots started, An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry.

The Race Riots

July 27 to August 3, 1919 

The Race Riots of 1919 was a violent conflict initiated by white Americans in Chicago in America. It was part of a string of over 20 riots occurring in the period after World War I, also called the Red Summer. On July 27, a white man stoned a black youth to death who had accidentally floated into an area in the Michigan lake ‘reserved’ for whites. The police refused to arrest the man responsible, triggering an uproar amongst the black community in the Chigaco South Side. Across 13 lawless days, 38 people died (23 black lives and 15 white) and over a thousand black families were made homeless in an already overcrowded city (Race Riots 1919). 

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Race Riots" and a map of the South Side of Chicago, where the riots started.

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Race Riots" and a map of Kiev,the epicenter of the civil war, An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry..

The Russian Civil War

​October - November, 1919 

The Russian Civil War was an arduous battle for control of the country initiated after the October Revolution and was fought by various political groups with differing agendas and ideals. The two most significant fronts were the Bolsheviks and the Red Army. Because of the disparity between groups, the Russian Civil War was far-reaching and permeated all classes, political orientations, and the military. Britain, France, and America all sent troops in an attempt to quash the Bolsheviks. By 1919, sparked by the end of World War I, foreign troops began to withdraw from Russia. The Bolsheviks came out victorious, partly due to their highly successful and pervasive propaganda campaigns (Russian Civil War 1919).

Spittoon engraved and enameled "Race Riots" and a map of Kiev,the epicenter of the civil war.

Spittoon engraved and enamelled "Great Iraqi Revolution" with a map of Najaf and Karbala, the primary sites of the revolution. An Archive of 1919, by Pritika Chowdhry.

Spittoon engraved and enamelled "Great Iraqi Revolution" with a map of Najaf and Karbala, the primary sites of the revolution.

Great Iraqi Revolution

October 1920 

October of 1920 saw the commencement of mass demonstrations against the British occupation in Iraq – known as the Great Iraqi Revolution. The announcement of new land ownership and burial taxes spurred the revolution and antagonized the tribal Shia regions. The revolution was a success in gaining greater autonomy for Iraq. 

Even though this event occurred in 1920, I included it in this archive, because I felt it was directly caused by the political events of 1919 in Iraq and surrounding areas, and it is very relevant to understand the contemporary nation of Iraq (Great Iraqi Revolution 1920).

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